Organizing Isolation launched, on sale now from Linoleum Press

Last Friday night, the CEPA Studio Loft hosted the launch party for my debut poetry collection, Organizing Isolation: Half-Lives of Love at Long Distance.

Getting the #spot ready for tomorrow! Meet me @ 7pm right here.

A post shared by Aidan Ryan (@aidanlyaeus) on Apr 27, 2017 at 3:12pm PDT

The space was decorated with glossy prints of some of the poems from the book (as well as a taxidermied fox and a two-headed pigeon). My dear friends Noah Falck, Alana Kelley, and Gerry Crinnin read from their own work before I cracked open OI and read these poems to an audience for the first time.

About the Book

Organizing Isolation began with an initial act of theft. Emboldened, I embarked on a stealing spree that carried me from September 2016 through January 2017, a feat possible only, I think, because I was “lightly employed” as an adjunct professor at Canisius College during those months. Continue reading

Advertisements

Organizing Isolation on Peach, and Other Poetry #Wins This Week

been a week full of poetry #wins.

  1. Me on Peach.
  2. Babble at Geneseo.
  3. Dave Eggers at Bable.
  4. Toni Morrison on her way to Buffalo.
  5. Eve Wilson on AFROPUNK.
  6. Prince on Foundlings.

This isn’t in chronological order, nor is it in order of importance. But this post started as a way to share the poems from my new book that Peach Mag featured today. The Peach patrol picked three poems from ORGANIZING ISOLATION to post. They’re an interesting cross-section of what you’d find in the book — page poems, voice poems, and poems that don’t really qualify as poems.

Continue reading

One editor’s tips for writers submitting to journals, lit mags, and zines

There are “rules” for sending your work to literary magazines, and they don’t usually appear in submission guidelines.

Foundlings Vol. 3 will be out in just about two months. We’re very excited about this, but we can’t share any information about the contents just yet. Submissions closed at the end of March, and we’ve been reviewing them since then. It’s a humbling thing to see an inbox full of so much stirring work from so many writers, friends and strangers both, and a difficult task to pick just a few poems to include in each volume of the magazine. Being an editor, or any kind of curator, forces you to examine your own gut reactions to writing, and to articulate your artistic beliefs and preferences to yourself, to the other editors who share in this work, and eventually to the writers who’ve submitted. (At least, we try — more on that further down.)

I don’t submit my own work to magazines as often as I used to (and some day soon I hope to explain why), but I still devote a lot of postage every year to SASEs. My file of rejections — digital and physical — continues to swell steadily, at a greater annual rate of growth than any of my financial investments.

Now, though, a full year and a half since the other Foundlings editors and I decided to start our project, and after three rounds of submissions, I’m starting to think like an editor. I’ve begun to recognize the most common sins hopeful writers commit during the submissions process. And, lest you misunderstand me, I’m not about to dish on unsavory side of the Foundlings Gmail inbox. We do see some faux pas; some writers make us uncomfortable, and some are unpardonably swinish and rude. But the vast majority are awesome.

This isn’t about our submissions. Instead, I think, the act of editing now three volumes of poetry, and all the ways that’s drawn me into sharing more and more pints and conversations with other writers and editors, have made me more aware of the peccadilloes and travesties writers so frequently commit in their pursuit of publication. For most of the rules below, I could provide a counterexample from my own catalog of bad habits and regrets.

So, read on for a few tips all hopeful writers would do well to remember when submitting their work to lit mags and zines.

1. Be the Wayne Gretzky of letters. Or at least the Happy Gilmore.

While many have debated both the attribution and the mathematical accuracy of The Great One’s famous assertion that “You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take,” even the most cynical cannot deflect this slapshot of an aphorism. I’ve heard many writers explain why they haven’t submitted to such-and-such a magazine, and their reasons are usually pretty similar: “I don’t know if they’ll like me,” or “I’m not sure if I’m ready yet,” or “They only publish people with MFAs/cool names.”

Image result for gilmore girls gifs

All of these things might be true. Editors might not like you. You might not be ready yet. And entire magazine staffs might have really idiotic and lame conscious or unconscious biases. But you should probably submit anyway. Take that shot.

In most cases, the excuses I’ve listed above are code for “I’m not a serious writer.” So, maybe you aren’t. That doesn’t mean you’ll never be a serious writer. The change could come when you decide that you have to be great, that you are great, and that other people will love you for it. Not all the people who feel that way are, great, of course. But the people who feel that way are more likely to keep writing and keep submitting until they do write good work; more likely to submit that good work; and more likely to see their good work in print.

There are only two reasons that should ever stop you from licking that stamp. One, don’t submit if you know in the blue flame of your writerly heart that you’d be mortified to see some flawed or unfinished work in print. For the second reason, keep reading.

Continue reading

“Speak, poet”: Buffalo News highlights new poets in the city’s scene

The Buffalo News Gusto cover last week featured an arresting image: facing out of the page, a man in a black leather jacket, head bent to a slim volume in his right hand, left hand rising and cupping as if around a palmed bird or baseball, lips curled to push out a poem.

This is News photographer Mark Mulville’s shot of Justin Karcher, on the night of the launch party, at Alley Cat, of his latest release, the chapbook When Severed Ears Sing You Songs, from Cringeworthy Poets Collective Press.

This night brought together several of the key players, collectives, presses, and movements Lizz Schumer covered in her excellent Gusto feature “Speak, poet,” on the vibrancy of the Buffalo poetry scene, and on the young people keeping the city’s rich poetic traditions alive and fresh.

Go on — read the article.

Oh, right: and that’s me pictured above, again thanks to Mark Mulville. Schumer was kind enough to include a shout-out to Foundlings, and mentioned the upcoming release party for my collection Organizing Isolation (Linoleum Press).