My Next Heart: In Conversation with Buffalo Spree

In late February, Buffalo Spree invited Justin Karcher, Noah Falck, and me to discuss our yearlong process of producing My Next Heart: New Buffalo Poetry ( Blazevox, 2017), an anthology that captures many of the most prominent and exciting young voices making noise in the city’s poetry scene today — what Spree called a “younger generation of poets writing about how Buffalo has left its stamp on them — and vice versa.”

Noah encapsulated the project, and our experience working together, beautifully during the interview:

Because we’ve got such different poetics, and Justin also has a theater background, there are so many different microcommunities that we were able to bring under this one project. This project is an opportunity to build bridges within the Buffalo literary community. It’s also a wonderful way to highlight a great number of energetic and creative young people writing in this city. I think this project acts as a conduit to future conversations about the work happening here.

Read the full interview online:

http://www.buffalospree.com/Blogs/Be-There/April-2018/An-anthology-of-Buffalo-poets/

Buy My Next Heart:

http://www.blazevox.org/index.php/Shop/new-releases/my-next-heart-new-buffalo-poetry-eds-noah-falck-and-justin-karcher-505/

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Foundlings Launches Publishing Collab With The Public, and New Collection of Essays From Bruce Fisher

On 6 April Foundlings Press unveiled a new website and announced a publishing collaboration with The Public: The Public Books. This historic joint venture — which brings together Buffalo’s hottest new publisher with the region’s premier weekly source of news, arts, and commentary — is both an imprint of Foundlings Press and the publishing arm of The Public, producing full-length books on culture, economic policy, local history, and the arts.

The Public Books launch coincided with the release of the imprint’s first title, Bruce Fisher’s Where The Streets Are Paved With Rust: Essays From America’s Broken Heartland, Vol. 1. The release party featured poetry from Justin Karcher, music from DJs Shane and Tone, and remarks from Bruce Fisher — and also offered guests an advance look at the new Community Beer Works Brewery at 520 Seventh St. in the city’s Lower West Side.

Copies of the book are available for purchase at Buffalo’s Talking Leaves and directly from FoundlingsPress.com.

 

Foundlings Enters ‘Next Phase’ with Lytton Smith’s My Radar Data Knows Its Thing

Buffalo News Art Critic Colin Dabkowski Traces the Transformation of a Magazine into a Press

“Foundlings Press Enters New Phase”

From the outside, the past few days might have seemed like a startling explosion of growth for Foundlings Press. Last Wednesday we announced our formal publishing partnership with The Public, Western New York’s alternative weekly newspaper, and teased the cover of our first title under the “Public Books” imprint, Bruce Fisher’s Where The Streets Are Paved With Rust: Essays From America’s Broken Heartland, Vol. 1, to be officially released Friday 6 April at Community Beer Works’ new Jersey Street location. This Friday, 16 March, at Hotel Henry, we’re releasing our first poetry collection, Lytton Smith’s My Radar Data Knows Its Thing, winner of the 2017 Foundlings Artist Residency and Chapbook Contest, designed by guest book artist Stephen Fitzmaurice. Meanwhile, we’re nearing the end of our open submission period for an upcoming release celebrating the life and work of the poet Frank Stanford.

These projects may all have come to fruition within the same short time frame, but, as Buffalo News Art Critic Colin Dabkowski explains in today’s paper, all are the products of a long period of gestation, as Foundlings gradually transformed from a biannual print publication with a modest circulation into what it is today: an independent literary publishing house with a national audience and roster of writers.

“With this book launch, a planned second residency, and another book on the way,” Dabkowski writes, “the fledgling Foundlings is off to a good start.”

More About My Radar

Book Launch Reading and Reception

Hotel Henry

444 Forest Ave, Buffalo, NY 14213

100 Acres Restaurant and LBAC Gallery

6pm: Cocktails

7pm: Poetry (Noah Falck, Janet McNally, and Lytton Smith)

8pm: Book sales and signing (plus more cocktails)

 

Lytton Smith’s My Radar Data Knows Its Thing, winner of the 2017 Foundlings Press Artist Residency and Chapbook Contest, is a deeply sensitive, wide-ranging, and lyrical exploration of human connection, technology, proximity, the past in the present, and the natural environment.

“With each poem that begins with his namesake’s classic line, Lytton Smith’s chapbook tests the limits of language just as it tests the limits of human relationships,” the poet Anthony Caleshu writes.” Words hold us together even when we’re questioning their validity. Our linguistic (and so our human) scale has just gotten bigger and bolder.”

The book features illustrations and conceptual design from Philadelphia-based artist Stephen Fitzmaurice.

Lytton Smith is the author of two books of poetry from Nightboat Books and the translator of several books from the Icelandic. The novel Öræfi—the Wastelands, from the Icelandic of Ófeigur Sigurðsson, will be published by Deep Vellum in spring 2018. He is Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing at SUNY Geneseo.

New Writing in 2018

My attention will soon have to turn to all of the exciting Foundlings publications and other projects popping up and popping off in this first half of 2018. I have had a few small publications of my own worth mentioning, though.

The most noteworthy, and the most fun to write, was an essay on Buffalo’s Silo City and some of the men and women who’ve shaped the place over the years. In “The Next Gyration” I profiled Rick Smith, Swannie Jim, members of ELAB and Torn Space, and Harry R. Wait, the engineer whose slipform technique first allowed the silos to rise. Find it in the latest issue of Traffic East.

Speaking of Torn Space, I got to review that company’s exceptional production of Caryl Churchill’s Far Away. Read it in Buffalo Theatre Guide.

On Valentine’s Day, a Twitter-project called The Napkin Letter featured a new poem of mine, “dry january.” (Expect more work in this vein.)

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

 

Foundlings on the Radio

A few weeks back Darren Canham and I joined Al Abonado in the WAYO 104.3 studios for an interview on “Flour City Yawp.” For a year now Al has been interviewing Western New York writers and tons of poets who pass through Rochester. We got to talk with Al about the beginnings of Foundlings Magazine, our transformation into Foundlings Press, our thoughts on the Buffalo literary scene, and our plans for the future.

Listen to the full interview here:

https://wayofm.org/shows/episodes/12212017-3